Category Archives: History

THE LOSS AND AFTERMATH OF H.M. SUBMARINE P36

H.M. Submarine P36, had a very short life. She left Portsmouth for Gibraltar in December 1941, then proceeded to join the famous 10th Submarine Flotilla at Malta (15 January 1942), which played so much havoc with convoys bound for North Africa during WWII. P36 was sunk on April 1, 1942.

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Romegas, The Wolf of the Sea

By Joseph-Stephen Bonanno  B.A. (Hons.) (Melit.)

The Hospitaller Order of St John of Jerusalem, throughout its long history, always produced famous naval commanders for her galleys.  Knights of great experience, who were grown old in the service, and who were most of them qualified to command considerable fleets: such were the commander...

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The gondola of Venice

On Friday 5th December 2014, I had the opportunity to visit the Museo Storico Navale (historical naval museum) of Venice, which is owned by the Italian Navy. Since 1958 the museum is housed in a building dating from the 15th Century which was once the Granary of the “Serenissima” (The Most Serene Republic of Venice), on the water front in Campo San Biagio, near the Arsenal. It was the Austrians who, in 1815, first had the idea of assembling the remnants of the Venetian navy and creating a historical naval museum.

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H. M. MOTOR LAUNCH 130

By 1942 the western Mediterranean had become an extremely dangerous place for even the most powerful British warships. For the small, wooden, lightly armed Fairmile B Motor Launches, it was death trap which made cunning and deception a vital recipe for survival. Although they lacked the speed of the Motor Torpedo Boats and Motor Gun Boats, they proved their worth time and again with their versality and ability to operate in heavy weather. Also, although they lacked the speed to deal decisively with the faster S-boote, the Fairmiles packed heavy firepower and provided a significant deterrent to the German convoy raiders.The following pages are the story of one of these motor launches: H.M.M.L. 130 or simply, ML 130.

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HMS Olympus: a historical note

During the Second World War, due to the difficulty of passing convoys to Malta, submarines were used to run essential supplies to the island. Among those which contributed towards this hazardous task was HMS Olympus (N35), which unfortunately, in the early hours of 8th May 1942, few kilometers off the coast of Malta, is said that hit a mine and sunk.

HMS Olympus, an O- or Odin-Class submarine, was commissioned in 1930. This class submarine measured 86.5 meters length, 6.1 meters width and had a draft of 4.9 meters. Her displacement was 1,781 tons surfaced and 2,038 tons when submerged.

From 1931-1939 HMS Olympus formed part of the 4th Flotilla operating out of Hong Kong. After that she was with the 8th Flotilla, in Colombo, Ceylon (modern day Sri Lanka). In 1940 she was redeployed to the Mediterranean.

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The discovery of Burdigala

Greek island of Kea truly inspires divers from all over the world. No wonder: an illustrious HMHS Britannic is lying just a few miles offshore. But it is not the only Kean underwater treasure. Making an approach to Korissia port technical divers can spot another intriguing location – S/S Burdigala. And that’s exactly where U-Boat Malta expedition headed to after having finished things on Britannic.

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The history of WW2: ‘Magic Carpet’ flying underwater

Numerous wrecks lying around Malta dumbly bear testimonies about the past. Many of those sunken ships clearly remember their last days, done in midstream of World War II. Back at those time Malta bravely served as a bastion of the Royal Navy in the Mediterranean. The country courageously resisted massive attacks of the Axis powers, but supplies were running very low…

In 1941 it became clear that the supply of Malta by surface ship would be a hazardous operation involving both Force H at Gibraltar and the Fleet at Alexandria. From either base, a passage of some 1,000 miles was involved for merchantmen i.e. four days steaming of which a considerable proportion would be in a daylight, outside British air cover and within range of Axis air bases. Also, from the advent of enemy’s air power such a supplement became essential, and could be provided only at great risk by fast surface warships, or by the use of submarines.

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Pages of History: last voyage for “Polynesien”

“Polynesia” was launched in 1890. After almost 30 years of perfect service it was attacked by the German submersible boat. For nearly 100 years she’s been resting a couple of miles away from Valletta harbor. The ship seems to be a real magnet for divers and researches, attracting their attention for decades. No wonder “Polynesia” is now known as a “Titanic of the Mediterenean”…

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